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nsla presentation and lcp next steps

Last week, Mary Jane and I met to discuss our presentation at the Nova Scotia Library Assocation coming up in September, and here is our conference plan:

NSLA planning meeting Aug 2_17

Over the next couple of weeks, we will  pull together the information (most of which we already have) and create the slides.

We also planned some next steps for our LCPs. We are looking to consult with faculty and will plan to do that after September when their workload begins to settle down.

  • Getting into the classroom to develop a “People in Practice” model
  • MJ is looking at setting up drop-in editing sessions and will work with Amanda (based on her Writing Centre work)
  • Interview communications instructors about the struggles students in skilled trades seem to have with communications classes.
  • Interview faculty members in a skilled trade program about the “information literacy” skills needed in their field. (Ask questions about the types of resources used on the job, eg, email, procedures manuals, standards).
  • Find out about being involved in the development of a new information literacy plan for NSCC Library Services.

 

developing strong library collections

Over the past couple of months, I have been exploring ways to analyse the use of our library collections, both print and electronic. I am currently in the process of exploring a collections analysis tool, LibInsight, in which I have started loading usage statistics for e-resources. I am also working with a Novanet tool, Greenglass, which was a snapshot of our print collections taken in December of 2016. Over the next few months I’ll explore both of these tools and other reporting options so I can develop a plan for analysing our library collections to ensure we are providing what we need to.

workplace info lit

I’ve been researching workplace information literacy in preparation for our presentation at the fall 2017 NSLA Conference. Here are a few articles of note:

Bird, N. J., Crumpton, M., Ozan, M., & Williams, T. (2012). Workplace information literacy: a neglected priority for community college libraries. Journal of Business & Financial Librarianship, 17(1), 18-33. doi:10.1080/08963568.2012.630593

Crumpton, M., (2014, October). Teaching Workplace Information Literacy. Paper presented at the Georgia International Conference on Information Literacy. Retrieved from: http://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1053&context=gaintlit

Forster, M. (2017). How is information literacy experienced in the workplace? In Information literacy in the workplace (pp. 11-28). London, England: Facet.http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/nscc/detail.action?docID=4834744

Forster, M. (2017). The ‘Workplace Experience Framework’ and evidence-based information literacy education. In Information literacy in the workplace (pp. 149-164). London, England: Facet.http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/nscc/detail.action?docID=4834744

Hollenbeck, Kevin. (1993). An Introduction to Workplace Literacy Programs. In Classrooms in the Workplace Workplace: Literacy Programs in Small- and Medium-Sized Firms. Kalamazoo, MI: W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, pp. 1-6. https://doi.org/10.17848/9780585246093

Molopyane, J., Fourie, I. (2015) A framework for workplace information literacy in academic contexts: Central University of Technology, Free State (South Africa) as case studyLibrary Hi Tech, Vol. 33 Issue: 4, pp.562-583https://doi.org/10.1108/LHT-02-2015-0013

Ruleman, A., Horne-Popp, L., Hallis, R. (2017, March 22-25). Show me the learning: navigating information literacy through multiple life perspectives. Paper presented at the ACRL Conference, At the Helm: Leading Transormation. Retrieved from: http://www.ala.org/acrl/sites/ala.org.acrl/files/content/conferences/confsandpreconfs/2017/ShowMetheLearning.pdf

 

 

I am also investigating JobJunction which is located in Halifax: http://www.jobjunction.ca/about/

 

 

writing

My creativity mentor recommended a 40-day writing course to me, and I am in day 35! It’s been a fascinating journey to unravel and recreate myself as a writer, and it has revealed something in me that I didn’t expect. So, here I go, a Shakespearean sonnet about the place I love the most:

Chéverie, My Love

What mys’try do you hide within your walls

What story will you tell when layers lift

What ghosts will beckon when my spirit calls

What words upon my page be cast adrift?

 

The ocean breezes come and go at will

New tides each day cast stories at my feet

The eagle sits upon a branch, so still

Within the space where tide and time do meet

 

You’ve seen them come and go, so many loves

Fair-footed, feathered, differently attired

Birds of the air, fleet foxes, sweet young wives

You’ve witnessed through the years and much admired

 

And ‘neath the faded paper of your world

The story of your life to me unfurls.

workplace info lit and nscc library services

On Thursday, June 22, Mary Jane and I gave a brief presentation about workplace information literacy at an all-Library Services staff meeting. We discussed how our training is well suited to helping our students develop 21st century skills and essential workplace skills. Here’s our presentation:

Workplace information literacy

Over the next couple of weeks, we plan to send a survey out to the staff to ask about specific work they are doing to support essential workplace skills.

canada business network – nova scotia

On May 24, I went to visit the Canada Business Network office in Halifax and learned about the services for entrepreneurs and small businesses which they offer which include:

  • Help navigating federal, provincial and other funding
  • Secondary market research, such as demographics, using databases they license (Paul will send me a list of these), which include Ibisworld, Gale products, Salegenic, Statistica, Conference Board of Canada and PCensus.
  • This office has a toll free phone number and email, or clients may contact Paul Gerin (Business Development Officer) or Cindy Allen (Communications Officer) directly to help with tier 2 research beyond what the call center can provide.
  • Some other sources noted were:
    • NSBI Market Research
    • Connections (guide for immigrants who are starting businesses)
    • Halifax Central Library entrepreneurship presentations and one-to-one consulting on the resources they have available to help entrepreneurs and small businesses startups, refers clients to the Business Center for more specific information
    • CBDC (which has an Atlantic association)
    • CAP
    • Springboard Atlantic
    • NRC Concierge Service – identifies funding and research
    • Centre for Women in Business – holds an event at which all service providers are welcome
    • CEED.CA workshops and training (Bayer’s Road)
  • Some possibilities we discussed:
    • NSCC Library Services could be added to canadabusiness.ca, identifying our e-resources which can be used on-site at NSCC libraries.
    • Information about Canada Business Network and other related institutions could be added to NSCC’s Library Liaison program
  • Canada Business Network could help with the following:
    • If instructors gave them a heads-up on market research students would need for a course, they could have it pre-assembled and could give to students who contact them.
    • New grads who are looking at entrepreneurial opportunities can contact the call center to get help with market research (although local requests get sent to Paul or Cindy).
    • They could deliver a presentation to Library Services staff.
    • They are going to send out brochures that I will distribute to Library Services.

learning success – a reflection on my asl course

I did it. I completed my first American Sign Language course. This may have been one of the biggest and most enjoyable challenges of my life. The class was mixed in ages, and my brain definitely did not work as well as those of the younger students in the class, so I had to work harder. That was a new experience for me. I’m used to being one of the first in the class to “get it” and this was humbling.

It was fascinating to be in a class with a deaf instructor. In order to communicate with her, I had no choice but to learn the language; it wasn’t like my French class where I could ask the instructor things in English if I didn’t have the French words. I appreciated the peace in the classroom (no one talked aloud) and I now think that all students should learn some basic sign language in elementary school. Otherwise, for those whose only language is ASL, the world is very closed, and for the rest of us we miss the opportunity to communicate with these people.

Of all the diversity training I’ve taken over the years, I think this course demonstrated to me best of all why our world is a better place when we have diverse workplaces, when many voices are able to be represented in our social structures.

And I got a pretty good grade:

ASL