blog

applying my learning: librarians’ presentation and faculty focus group

Developing a presentation for librarians:

On Monday, I met with Mary Jane to discuss putting together a presentation for NSCC librarians on People in Practice and Collection Profiling. We plan to present something to them in August.

In preparation, I will meet with two campus librarians next week to discuss collection evaluation practices in a 21st century library. I’m putting together documentation in preparation, including:

  • Reports I can offer, such as
    • Shelf-lists and circ reports
    • Ebook usage reports with subject analysis
    • Search terms used in our databases
    • OCLC reports

 

Focus group session with business faculty:

Next week, I meet with three business faculty for mini-focus group questions about industry reports, so we can provide better access to our resources based on the information needs of our current students.

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learner-centered instruction

I’ve been following Academic Impressions, and today’s post was about building student-centered learning models:

Courses with No Syllabi: A Unique Instructional Model at LDS Business College

– An interview with Bruce Kusch

 

Kusch pioneered the i4 model of design, instruction that is:

  • Immersive,
  • Integrated,
  • Interactive, and
  • Iterative.

 

applying my lcp – sharing key findings

I met with one of my mentors yesterday and she asked if I could pull together some of my observations on workplace info lit, so here it is:

  • Annemarie Lloyd is a lead researcher in workplace information literacy. She indicates employers are reporting that students leave formal education lacking “critical information literacies that enable them to think creatively, to find solutions to real-world problems” (Lloyd 2013, p. 221).
  • According to 2015 research conducted by Workopolis, Canada’s largest career site for job seekers, employers report that soft-skills deficits outweigh those of technical skills in candidates they interview: https://hiring.workopolis.com/article/viii-skills/
  • Based on my conversations with my LCP mentors, NSCC addresses workplace essential skills in an ad-hoc manner. Some solutions include:
    • There is a Writing Centre pilot for Metro campuses.
    • Some 21st century skills addressed by Communications Faculty.
    • At some campuses, LCAs offer courses and training in soft skills, such as interview and resume help, organizational skills, note-taking and effective communication.
    • Library services offers some support, such as finding and evaluating information, help with digital skills and learning about some information resources in industry.
    • Some program-specific faculty address soft skills that will be needed in their particular work environment.
    • NSCC provides some information for students in trades programs about the essential skills they will need, eg: https://www.nscc.ca/docs/admissions/nscc_tradestechnology_preparationchecklist.pdf
  • Some colleges take a coordinated approach: Douglas College offers specific programming in in the area of workplace essential skills: https://www.douglascollege.ca/programs-courses/training-group/essential-skills/programs It also offers a Essential Skills practitioner training: https://www.douglascollege.ca/programs-courses/training-group/essential-skills/practitioner-training-certificate

 

 

 

 

Lloyd, A. (2013). Building information resilient workers: The critical ground of workplace information literacy. What have we learnt? In S. Kurbanog˘lu, E. Grassian, D. Mizrachi, R. Catts, & S. Špiranec (Eds.), Worldwide commonalities and challenges in information literacy research and practice (Vol. 397, pp. 219–228). Cham, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing. doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-03919-0_28

Workopolis Hiring. (2018). Thinkopolis: Top Job Skills in Canada in 2015 | Workopolis. [online] Available at: https://hiring.workopolis.com/article/viii-skills/ [Accessed 26 Apr. 2018].

applying my lcp – creative me

One of the biggest reasons I started my LCP was to get back to being a creative learner. I’ve taken courses on learning and being creative, and over the last three years I’ve learned to think of myself as a creative person again.

When I went to meet with my creativity mentor a year or so ago, this was the saying she had on her wall (a quote from Annie Dillard). It resonated with me, and I just started hooking rugs, so I thought I’d preserve the quote in yarn:

Rug hooking project

applying my lcp – helping students find business information

Today, one of the campus librarians and I met with the Business representative from our major database subscriber to learn how to pull out industry profiles and reports. Our faculty have been asking for this information, and one response I provided was the webinar I set up with the Canada Business Centre. Today, I learned more about the business resources in Proquest Central (our major database) that support industry support. These include:

Company information:

  • Reportal
  • Netwise
  • Plunkett

Industry reports:

  • Business Monitor (BMI)
  • D & B First Research reports
  • Aroq
  • Some reports from Euromonitor

Industry reports with more granular information:

  • Plunkett
  • Barnes

Country information:

  • Economic Intelligence Unit
  • Chart Maker (has charts which students can incorporate into presentations, although Proquest reports can all be copied into presentations)

 

Over the summer I am going to look at providing more education for campus library staff and ways to pull these resources out in our LibGuides.

applying my lcp to 21st century library collections: the rubber hits the road!

I am looking at developing collection evaluation practices that could help NSCC Libraries redefine how we select and promote resources to support workplace literacy. I hope to work with some of the campus librarians over the summer to flesh out these plans.

Here are some things I’m considering:

Background:

In a 2012 Issue Brief, the Association of Research Libraries indicated that the 21st century requires a significant shift in thinking about library collection development “from thinking of collections as products to understanding collections as components of the academy’s knowledge resources”. We are called to “transition from institution-centric collections to a user-centric networked world” (p. 1).

In order to develop collections for 21st century libraries, we could examine our current collections development and evaluation practices so we can determine what is effective and what needs more support.

Johnson (2016) describes collection evaluation as a process which involves both collection analysis and collection assessment.

Collection analysis takes a snapshot of the library collection at a point in time, including circulation, number of titles in a subject area and funds spent in a subject area. This is sometimes referred to as collection profiling (Johnson, 2014).

Collection assessment is the ongoing process of developing a library collection by determining how well particular subjects are supported, how it compares to other similar libraries and the extent to which the materials purchase are what users actually want.

Goal:

To examine the current collection evaluation processes undertaken by Campus Librarians at NSCC and determine if there are other resources we could use to develop to help them create collection development plans.

 

 

References

Association of Research Libraries. (2012, March 10). 21st century collections: Calibration of investment and collaborative action. Retrieved from: http://www.arl.org/storage/documents/publications/issue-brief-21st-century-collections-2012.pdf

Johnson, Q. (2016). Moving from Analysis to Assessment: Strategic Assessment of Library Collections. Journal of Library Administration,56(4), 488-498. doi:10.1080/01930826.2016.1157425

 

 

applying my lcp learning to a “people in practice” model

Today I met with one of our campus librarians to discuss developing a “collection profiling” plan to support “people in practice”. I have offered to work with her to focus on an area of her collection to examine. I have offered to send her a shelf-list and circulation report, so she can begin to examine her collection to determine if it is effective in reflecting workplace information.

_______________________________________________________________________

Here is an overview of People in Practice that I put together from some of the resources I’ve identified throughout my LCP:

Lloyd (2013) introduces the concept of “information resilience”, which she describes as the ability to operationalize information skills and activities in the workplace (p. 220). She points out that employers are reporting that students leave formal education lacking “critical information literacies that enable them to think creatively, to find solutions to real-world problems” (p. 221), and she proposes a “people-in-practice” model which encourages practitioners to “connect with the workplace knowledges of their disciplines” (p. 226).

Monge and Frisicaro-Pawlowski (2013) traditional “college-centric” information literacy (IL) practices do not prepare students for the “social and contextual” learning that is required in workplaces and recommends that librarians and faculty collaborate to create “discipline-specific” IL guidelines  (p. 60). They recommend “abandoning the concept of information literacy as a stand-alone universal skill set” and propose the following practices (p. 66):

  • Establishing learning guidelines by discipline and course;
  • Establishing a collaborative, flexible relationship with teaching faculty;
  • Creating assignments to be collaborative and reflective of workplace projects;
  • Teaching students to create personal learning environments (eg, web-based calendars, blogs, online study groups).

Bird & Williams (2014) describes an information literacy program design in which the librarian works with students to:

  • Explore job characteristics for their program by examining job descriptions and government information for career exploration. In their sessions the authors used words brainstormed by students in their class to create a “word cloud” which highlighted the importance of information skills in that field of study.
  • Brainstorm likely problems that could arise in the workplace and discuss how these information needs would be solved.

Hicks (2015) advocates that information literacy is context-specific and not a generic, transferrable skill (p. 26). He recommends conducting interviews with people in the particular field  to help students understand how information is used in their field.

 

Bird, N. J., & Williams, T. (2014). Casting a wider net: O*NET, workforce development, and information literacy. RUSQ: Reference and User Services Quarterly53(3), 227–231. Retrieved from https://libres.uncg.edu/ir/uncg/f/N_Bird_Casting_2014.pdf

Hicks, A. (2015). Drinking on the job: integrating workplace information literacy into the curriculum. LOEX Quarterly41(4), 9–15. Retrieved from http://scholar.colorado.edu/libr_facpapers/59/

Lloyd, A. (2013). Building information resilient workers: The critical ground of workplace information literacy. What have we learnt? In S. Kurbanog˘lu, E. Grassian, D. Mizrachi, R. Catts, & S. Špiranec (Eds.), Worldwide commonalities and challenges in information literacy research and practice (Vol. 397, pp. 219–228). Cham, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing. doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-03919-0_28

Monge, R., & Erica Frisicaro-Pawlowski, E. (2014). Redefining information literacy to prepare students for the 21st century workforce. Innovative Higher Education39 (1), 59–73. doi:10.1007/s10755-013-9260-5