learner-centered instruction

I’ve been following Academic Impressions, and today’s post was about building student-centered learning models:

Courses with No Syllabi: A Unique Instructional Model at LDS Business College

– An interview with Bruce Kusch

 

Kusch pioneered the i4 model of design, instruction that is:

  • Immersive,
  • Integrated,
  • Interactive, and
  • Iterative.

 

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applying my lcp – sharing key findings

I met with one of my mentors yesterday and she asked if I could pull together some of my observations on workplace info lit, so here it is:

  • Annemarie Lloyd is a lead researcher in workplace information literacy. She indicates employers are reporting that students leave formal education lacking “critical information literacies that enable them to think creatively, to find solutions to real-world problems” (Lloyd 2013, p. 221).
  • According to 2015 research conducted by Workopolis, Canada’s largest career site for job seekers, employers report that soft-skills deficits outweigh those of technical skills in candidates they interview: https://hiring.workopolis.com/article/viii-skills/
  • Based on my conversations with my LCP mentors, NSCC addresses workplace essential skills in an ad-hoc manner. Some solutions include:
    • There is a Writing Centre pilot for Metro campuses.
    • Some 21st century skills addressed by Communications Faculty.
    • At some campuses, LCAs offer courses and training in soft skills, such as interview and resume help, organizational skills, note-taking and effective communication.
    • Library services offers some support, such as finding and evaluating information, help with digital skills and learning about some information resources in industry.
    • Some program-specific faculty address soft skills that will be needed in their particular work environment.
    • NSCC provides some information for students in trades programs about the essential skills they will need, eg: https://www.nscc.ca/docs/admissions/nscc_tradestechnology_preparationchecklist.pdf
  • Some colleges take a coordinated approach: Douglas College offers specific programming in in the area of workplace essential skills: https://www.douglascollege.ca/programs-courses/training-group/essential-skills/programs It also offers a Essential Skills practitioner training: https://www.douglascollege.ca/programs-courses/training-group/essential-skills/practitioner-training-certificate

 

 

 

 

Lloyd, A. (2013). Building information resilient workers: The critical ground of workplace information literacy. What have we learnt? In S. Kurbanog˘lu, E. Grassian, D. Mizrachi, R. Catts, & S. Špiranec (Eds.), Worldwide commonalities and challenges in information literacy research and practice (Vol. 397, pp. 219–228). Cham, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing. doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-03919-0_28

Workopolis Hiring. (2018). Thinkopolis: Top Job Skills in Canada in 2015 | Workopolis. [online] Available at: https://hiring.workopolis.com/article/viii-skills/ [Accessed 26 Apr. 2018].

applying my lcp to 21st century library collections: the rubber hits the road!

I am looking at developing collection evaluation practices that could help NSCC Libraries redefine how we select and promote resources to support workplace literacy. I hope to work with some of the campus librarians over the summer to flesh out these plans.

Here are some things I’m considering:

Background:

In a 2012 Issue Brief, the Association of Research Libraries indicated that the 21st century requires a significant shift in thinking about library collection development “from thinking of collections as products to understanding collections as components of the academy’s knowledge resources”. We are called to “transition from institution-centric collections to a user-centric networked world” (p. 1).

In order to develop collections for 21st century libraries, we could examine our current collections development and evaluation practices so we can determine what is effective and what needs more support.

Johnson (2016) describes collection evaluation as a process which involves both collection analysis and collection assessment.

Collection analysis takes a snapshot of the library collection at a point in time, including circulation, number of titles in a subject area and funds spent in a subject area. This is sometimes referred to as collection profiling (Johnson, 2014).

Collection assessment is the ongoing process of developing a library collection by determining how well particular subjects are supported, how it compares to other similar libraries and the extent to which the materials purchase are what users actually want.

Goal:

To examine the current collection evaluation processes undertaken by Campus Librarians at NSCC and determine if there are other resources we could use to develop to help them create collection development plans.

 

 

References

Association of Research Libraries. (2012, March 10). 21st century collections: Calibration of investment and collaborative action. Retrieved from: http://www.arl.org/storage/documents/publications/issue-brief-21st-century-collections-2012.pdf

Johnson, Q. (2016). Moving from Analysis to Assessment: Strategic Assessment of Library Collections. Journal of Library Administration,56(4), 488-498. doi:10.1080/01930826.2016.1157425

 

 

applying my lcp learning to a “people in practice” model

Today I met with one of our campus librarians to discuss developing a “collection profiling” plan to support “people in practice”. I have offered to work with her to focus on an area of her collection to examine. I have offered to send her a shelf-list and circulation report, so she can begin to examine her collection to determine if it is effective in reflecting workplace information.

_______________________________________________________________________

Here is an overview of People in Practice that I put together from some of the resources I’ve identified throughout my LCP:

Lloyd (2013) introduces the concept of “information resilience”, which she describes as the ability to operationalize information skills and activities in the workplace (p. 220). She points out that employers are reporting that students leave formal education lacking “critical information literacies that enable them to think creatively, to find solutions to real-world problems” (p. 221), and she proposes a “people-in-practice” model which encourages practitioners to “connect with the workplace knowledges of their disciplines” (p. 226).

Monge and Frisicaro-Pawlowski (2013) traditional “college-centric” information literacy (IL) practices do not prepare students for the “social and contextual” learning that is required in workplaces and recommends that librarians and faculty collaborate to create “discipline-specific” IL guidelines  (p. 60). They recommend “abandoning the concept of information literacy as a stand-alone universal skill set” and propose the following practices (p. 66):

  • Establishing learning guidelines by discipline and course;
  • Establishing a collaborative, flexible relationship with teaching faculty;
  • Creating assignments to be collaborative and reflective of workplace projects;
  • Teaching students to create personal learning environments (eg, web-based calendars, blogs, online study groups).

Bird & Williams (2014) describes an information literacy program design in which the librarian works with students to:

  • Explore job characteristics for their program by examining job descriptions and government information for career exploration. In their sessions the authors used words brainstormed by students in their class to create a “word cloud” which highlighted the importance of information skills in that field of study.
  • Brainstorm likely problems that could arise in the workplace and discuss how these information needs would be solved.

Hicks (2015) advocates that information literacy is context-specific and not a generic, transferrable skill (p. 26). He recommends conducting interviews with people in the particular field  to help students understand how information is used in their field.

 

Bird, N. J., & Williams, T. (2014). Casting a wider net: O*NET, workforce development, and information literacy. RUSQ: Reference and User Services Quarterly53(3), 227–231. Retrieved from https://libres.uncg.edu/ir/uncg/f/N_Bird_Casting_2014.pdf

Hicks, A. (2015). Drinking on the job: integrating workplace information literacy into the curriculum. LOEX Quarterly41(4), 9–15. Retrieved from http://scholar.colorado.edu/libr_facpapers/59/

Lloyd, A. (2013). Building information resilient workers: The critical ground of workplace information literacy. What have we learnt? In S. Kurbanog˘lu, E. Grassian, D. Mizrachi, R. Catts, & S. Špiranec (Eds.), Worldwide commonalities and challenges in information literacy research and practice (Vol. 397, pp. 219–228). Cham, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing. doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-03919-0_28

Monge, R., & Erica Frisicaro-Pawlowski, E. (2014). Redefining information literacy to prepare students for the 21st century workforce. Innovative Higher Education39 (1), 59–73. doi:10.1007/s10755-013-9260-5

 

applying my lcp – building 21st century collections

In a 2012 Issue Brief, the Association of Research Libraries indicated that the 21st century requires a significant shift in thinking about library collection development “from thinking of collections as products to understanding collections as components of the academy’s knowledge resources”. We are called to “transition from institution-centric collections to a user-centric networked world” (p. 1).

In her seminal book on 21st century library collection development, Gregory (2011) recommends:

  • Examining what is in the collection and what is used (p. 17).
  • Working with the community (in our case faculty) to determine if the collection is suitable (p. 19).
  • Creating small selection teams to take advantage of multiple perspectives (p. 64).

 

In another seminal work, Johnson (2014) offers several methods of collection analysis, including:

  • Collection profiling – taking a statistical picture of the collection at one point in time.
  • List checking – comparing lists of key titles for the subject area to what is in the library’s collection.
  • Direct collection analysis – having someone with knowledge of the subject area scans the shelves to quickly assess the collection area.
  • Comparative statistics – examining the area of the collection in relation to other libraries.
  • Circulation studies – Examining circulation logs to determine what parts of the collection are used.

She also recommends consulting the community assess if the collection meets their needs.

Johnson (2016) describes collection evaluation as a process which involves both collection analysis and collection assessment.

  • Collection analysis is used to take a snapshot of the library collection at a particular point in time.
  • Collection assessment is the ongoing, process of determining how well subjects are supported, how the collection compares to other similar libraries, and if materials purchased are what users are looking for.

Association of Research Libraries. (2012, March 10). 21st century collections: Calibration of investment and collaborative action. Retrieved from: http://www.arl.org/storage/documents/publications/issue-brief-21st-century-collections-2012.pdf

Gregory, V. L. (2011). Collection development and management for 21st century library collections: an introduction. New York, NY: Neal-Schuman.

Johnson, P. (2014). Fundamentals of collection development and management. London: Facet.

Johnson, Q. (2016). Moving from Analysis to Assessment: Strategic Assessment of Library Collections. Journal of Library Administration,56(4), 488-498. doi:10.1080/01930826.2016.1157425

21st century college library collections – i’m on the right track!

Crumpton, M. A., & Bird, N. J. (2013). Handbook for Community College Librarians. Oxford: Pearson Education.

In Handbook for Community College Librarians (2013), two of the researchers I have frequently encountered in my workplace information literacy research, Michael. A. Crumpton and Nora J. Bird, have written about all aspects of library services in community colleges, including collection development. In reading this chapter, I was encouraged by the fact that, since I began with the College, I have been (and continue to be) involved in the implementation of a number of practices which they recommend. In this table, I have highlighted their recommendations and noted what my role has been in addressing this recommendation:

 

Recommendation Response
Instead of prescribed collection size the new 2012 ACRL standards encourages librarians to “use assessment and advocacy to build a case for what the …collection should be” (p. 88) Drafted the NSCC Library Liaison program collections piece.
Community college collections must focus on a wide variety of topics, support the current curriculum and rely on a smaller number of more recent materials (p. 88)  Implemented the Campus-based selection model we currently use.
Clear policies describing the collection and how it supports the institution’s mission, goals and objectives (p. 89) Researched and revised our Collection Policy.
Begin with a description of the communities which will use the collection (p. 89). Our Collection Policy articulates clients of the Program.
Popular fiction collections have been shown to increase reading levels (p. 90). Worked with Campus Librarians to develop the Public Library Deposit program procedures.
“Libraries in the digital age should not be buying collections of noncirculating materials” (p. 90) Currently implementing LibInsight  to evaluate print and online collections usage.
Acquire requested materials in the most expeditious way (p. 90). Developed processes and procedures for Proquest Thesis on demand purchasing and Reprints Desk purchasing for some ILL requests.
Monitor publications produced by the trades you support (p. 91).  Set up a webinar from Canada Business Centre for all Library Services staff, to explore business resources outside the college. I’m currently working with the Business representative from Proquest to learn how to promote industry reports in PQC.
Consult faculty on a regular basis for suggested materials (p. 90). This is included in the Library Liaison Program.
Use reviews, vendor tools and comparisons to items purchased by other institutions to find quality resources (p. 91). Worked with GOBI to set up reviews and the ability to see what other libraries have purchased a title. I’m currently looking at Worldcat and other tools to develop effective collection development processes.
Consider the best format — ebook, paperback, hardcover, dvd, etc. (p. 92).  Currently setting up LibInsight to help determine which subjects are best served by which formats.
Consider using a vendor to obtain catalogue records at the time of purchase (p. 92). Shelf-ready EDI ordering processes set up with Midwest.
Consider ownership versus access (p. 92)
DDA and leasing for ebooks. Purchasing only when they can’t be obtained through these means.
Set up cooperative e-resource arrangements when possible (p. 93). Worked on a consortial committee to set Novanet ebook DDA; work with CAUL Collections Committee on database leasing.
Use data to assess the collection (p. 95). Developing LibInsight datasets. Leading development of a plan for gathering subject usage data from library info desks.
There are strong rationales for establishing an archives in a community college – the yearbook collection is a good place to start (p. 96). Yearbook project, Archives policy underway.

 

 

 

21st century library collection development

Library collections in the 21st century (2011, December 05). Retrieved September 27, 2017, from https://youtu.be/6bofpsEciiQ

Last evening, I viewed a brief video presentation by James G. Neal, VP for Information Services and University Librarian, Columbia University/OCLC Board Trustee, in which he outlined four shifts driving 21st century library collection development:

  1. Primal innovation – We have to rethink what we are and be innovative.
  2. Deconstruction – We will have to tear apart what we have and creatively reassemble it, bringing in new parts as needed. He says that it no longer makes sense to think of library collections in terms of individual libraries.
  3. Radical collaboration – Libraries can no longer stand side by side as we have been doing (so well) but WITH each other, working as one and/or in collectives to accomplish our goals.
  4. Survival – We must focus on what the user needs, looking at non-traditional measures; Are users happy with our products and services? Are they achieving their goals with our support?

For the last 50 years, the goal of the larger library community has been to develop new approaches to coordinate collection development, but we have not done that; we have not been successful in implementing shared investments in collections. And now we are at the point where we must act as a collective by selecting, acquiring, owning, synthesizing, organizing and distributing TOGETHER.

  • We force users to make hard choices by limiting their information queries to what’s on OUR shelves.
  • Sophisticated interlibrary loan isn’t enough. User expectations have shifted dramatically and limitations of time and distance shouldn’t matter anymore.
  • With the massive decline in faculty coming to post-secondary libraries, we need to deliver content and functionality to the desktop of faculty and students and to deliver information in the online environment they are mostly in, to move librarians to the point of need.