applying my lcp – building knowledge of collections in industry

On Friday, I had a speaker from the Canada Business Network come in to deliver a virtual training session for any of the campus library staff who wanted to attend, and I even had a couple of faculty who attended. This center offers research assistance to students, faculty and anyone in Nova Scotia who needs business and demographic information. They can help faculty with research, students with assignments and people who are looking to set up new businesses with market research. This service is free!

I had visited the centre myself last year and wanted to highlight the resources for Library Services staff. Feedback has been very positive, and I will look for other opportunities to highlight resources beyond those we offer.

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keeping my learning brain active

One thing I’ve learned about myself through my LCP is that I love to learn, and I have a desire to learn. I’ve been taking courses since I started my LCP and have enjoyed them, and this has encouraged me to make sure I’m engaged in new learning. And there are so many options available now. I can see how today’s students are able to establish their own learning paths! I’ve been taking part in a Shakespeare course offered by Cape Breton University on Facebook, and it has been very satisfying to revisit my literary background of study.

Shakespeare course, CBU, Sep_2017

workplace info lit biblography

I’ve been researching workplace information literacy in preparation for our presentation at the fall 2017 NSLA Conference. Here are a few articles of note:

Bird, N. J., Crumpton, M., Ozan, M., & Williams, T. (2012). Workplace information literacy: a neglected priority for community college libraries. Journal of Business & Financial Librarianship, 17(1), 18-33. doi:10.1080/08963568.2012.630593

Crumpton, M., (2014, October). Teaching Workplace Information Literacy. Paper presented at the Georgia International Conference on Information Literacy. Retrieved from: http://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1053&context=gaintlit

Forster, M. (2017). How is information literacy experienced in the workplace? In Information literacy in the workplace (pp. 11-28). London, England: Facet.http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/nscc/detail.action?docID=4834744

Forster, M. (2017). The ‘Workplace Experience Framework’ and evidence-based information literacy education. In Information literacy in the workplace (pp. 149-164). London, England: Facet.http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/nscc/detail.action?docID=4834744

Harwood, C. (2012). State of the Literacy and Essential Skills Field. Canadian Literacy and Learning Network. Retrieved from: http://en.copian.ca/library/research/clln/state_of_es/state_of_es.pdf

Hollenbeck, Kevin. (1993). An Introduction to Workplace Literacy Programs. In Classrooms in the Workplace Workplace: Literacy Programs in Small- and Medium-Sized Firms. Kalamazoo, MI: W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, pp. 1-6. https://doi.org/10.17848/9780585246093

Molopyane, J., Fourie, I. (2015) A framework for workplace information literacy in academic contexts: Central University of Technology, Free State (South Africa) as case studyLibrary Hi Tech, Vol. 33 Issue: 4, pp.562-583https://doi.org/10.1108/LHT-02-2015-0013

Ruleman, A., Horne-Popp, L., Hallis, R. (2017, March 22-25). Show me the learning: navigating information literacy through multiple life perspectives. Paper presented at the ACRL Conference, At the Helm: Leading Transormation. Retrieved from: http://www.ala.org/acrl/sites/ala.org.acrl/files/content/conferences/confsandpreconfs/2017/ShowMetheLearning.pdf

 

 

canada business network – nova scotia

On May 24, I went to visit the Canada Business Network office in Halifax and learned about the services for entrepreneurs and small businesses which they offer which include:

  • Help navigating federal, provincial and other funding
  • Secondary market research, such as demographics, using databases they license (Paul will send me a list of these), which include Ibisworld, Gale products, Salegenic, Statistica, Conference Board of Canada and PCensus.
  • This office has a toll free phone number and email, or clients may contact Paul Gerin (Business Development Officer) or Cindy Allen (Communications Officer) directly to help with tier 2 research beyond what the call center can provide.
  • Some other sources noted were:
    • NSBI Market Research
    • Connections (guide for immigrants who are starting businesses)
    • Halifax Central Library entrepreneurship presentations and one-to-one consulting on the resources they have available to help entrepreneurs and small businesses startups, refers clients to the Business Center for more specific information
    • CBDC (which has an Atlantic association)
    • CAP
    • Springboard Atlantic
    • NRC Concierge Service – identifies funding and research
    • Centre for Women in Business – holds an event at which all service providers are welcome
    • CEED.CA workshops and training (Bayer’s Road)
  • Some possibilities we discussed:
    • NSCC Library Services could be added to canadabusiness.ca, identifying our e-resources which can be used on-site at NSCC libraries.
    • Information about Canada Business Network and other related institutions could be added to NSCC’s Library Liaison program
  • Canada Business Network could help with the following:
    • If instructors gave them a heads-up on market research students would need for a course, they could have it pre-assembled and could give to students who contact them.
    • New grads who are looking at entrepreneurial opportunities can contact the call center to get help with market research (although local requests get sent to Paul or Cindy).
    • They could deliver a presentation to Library Services staff.
    • They are going to send out brochures that I will distribute to Library Services.